Livingstone College

ADVISORY: Livingstone prepares for Hurricane Irma

Sept. 7, 2017

SALISBURY – Livingstone College’s Emergency Response Team met Thursday to review its hurricane preparation plans due to the threat of Hurricane Irma.

The path of Hurricane Irma and the impact it will have on this area is still uncertain. Our response team is monitoring this storm carefully and taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of our students, faculty and staff.

Our food service provider is stocking up on food and beverages to make sure we have an adequate supply for our on-campus residents. Students living off campus should stock up on food and water before the storm hits.

Should the need arise to cancel or delay classes, or if our emergency response team deems it necessary to evacuate the campus, students will be given ample notification by Livingstone College Police Chief and Public Safety Director Gloria Blaire via the college’s emergency alert notification system. This information will also be posted on our website (www.livingstone.edu) and Facebook and Twitter pages.

Any students planning to travel over the next 72 hours should take extra precautions, especially if your plans require you to travel south of Salisbury, which would place you heading into the path of Hurricane Irma.

In the meantime, we are advising all students, faculty and staff to use caution early next week when this area is expected to see the effects of the storm: Do not drive across flooded roadways; beware of downed power lines and fallen trees; charge all mobile phones in case of power outages; and have flashlights and batteries handy. (Candles are not allowed in residence halls.)
Remember, students will receive emergency alert notifications and can also check for updates on our website, and on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE
701 W. Monroe St., Salisbury, NC
www.livingstone.edu
Office of Communications and Public Relations
 
Contact:
Kimberly Harrington
Assistant director of public relations
(704) 216-6151 (office)
(704) 294-9431 (mobile)
kharrington@livingstone.edu

Sept. 7, 2017

 ADVISORY
Livingstone College prepares for Hurricane Irma

SALISBURY – Livingstone College’s Emergency Response Team met Thursday to review its hurricane preparation plans due to the threat of Hurricane Irma.

The path of Hurricane Irma and the impact it will have on this area is still uncertain. Our response team is monitoring this storm carefully and taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of our students, faculty and staff.

Our food service provider is stocking up on food and beverages to make sure we have an adequate supply for our on-campus residents. Students living off campus should stock up on food and water before the storm hits.

Should the need arise to cancel or delay classes, or if our emergency response team deems it necessary to evacuate the campus, students will be given ample notification by Livingstone College Police Chief and Public Safety Director Gloria Blaire via the college’s emergency alert notification system. This information will also be posted on our website (www.livingstone.edu) and Facebook and Twitter pages.

Any students planning to travel over the next 72 hours should take extra precautions, especially if your plans require you to travel south of Salisbury, which would place you heading into the path of Hurricane Irma.

In the meantime, we are advising all students, faculty and staff to use caution early next week when this area is expected to see the effects of the storm: Do not drive across flooded roadways; beware of downed power lines and fallen trees; charge all mobile phones in case of power outages; and have flashlights and batteries handy. (Candles are not allowed in residence halls.)
Remember, students will receive emergency alert notifications and can also check for updates on our website, and on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Livingstone College responds to report on HBCUs’ federal loans

A Charlotte TV news station reported on July 18 that in the last 10 years, HBCUs, including Livingstone College, Johnson C. Smith in Charlotte and Barber Scotia in Concord, borrowed $1.7 billion from the federal government to pay for campus upgrades, according to a Wall Street Journal article, adding that most of that money hasn’t been paid back. The following is Livingstone’s response to that report, which necessitated clarification.

Livingstone College’s statement:
“Over the past 16 years (2001-2017), Livingstone College’s cumulative debt to the U.S. Department of Education was $61 million. However, the college reduced its debt to approximately $22 million by 2016.
In 2015, the college refinanced and consolidated its existing debt with an additional $15 million loan to build two new structures: the F. George Shipman Science Annex Building and a new physical education building.
At current, our balance is $38 million with a lower interest rate and a monthly payment that is lower than what was being paid before consolidation; and we are current on all of our payments.
What’s important to note is that Livingstone College has not experienced a significant drop in enrollment in the past five years. In fact, the 2014 freshman class was the largest in the school’s history.
Let me also add that the new science annex, expected to be completed in 2018, will further enrich Livingstone’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) initiative and strengthen the college’s research infrastructure. These types of investments aid in student recruitment and thusly increases enrollment.” – Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr., President of Livingstone College.

Speakers talk on point with Bridge students

What does a legislative speech writer, an IT business analyst, and a media group CEO have in common?

Here’s a hint: They are all motivational speakers.

What they also share in common is that they have all spoken before Livingstone College’s bridge students this summer, sharing their own stories of triumph and inspiration.

Bridge students are those participating in the college’s summer Bridge Program, which prepares students for college enrollment by giving them a second chance at academic excellence. Upon completion, students are admitted into Livingstone in the fall as provisional students.

Believe in the I’MPossible
Keith L. Brown, the speech writer, is best known as Mr. I’m Possible. He kicked off the Bridge Program orientation – and rightly so.

Using upbeat music, chants and dancing, Brown captivated the audience with his sense of humor and relatability. As a young child, he was labeled as an at-risk special education student. Today, he is an author and developed a curriculum titled, “not impossible-I’M POSSIBLE: A Relevant Guide on Leadership and Life Skills for Students and Families,” which is being read and studied nationally and globally.

He has been named one of the top speakers and consultants in education by “Insight Publishing” and International Speakers Network.

After getting peer mentors and faculty on stage to do the Cupid Shuffle, a popular line dance, Brown engaged the audience, made up also of Upward Bound students, with a speech sprinkled with memorable quotes and catchphrases, such as:

  • Anybody can be a student, it takes effort to be a scholar;
  • The way you dress is the way you will be addressed;
  • I’m a prospect, not a suspect;
  • The company you keep will determine the levels you reach;
  • Those who laugh at you today will pay you tomorrow;
  • Dwell where you are celebrated, not tolerated;
  • A bus pass will keep you local; a passport will take you globally;
  • We need more reading over ringtones and more textbooks over text messages;
  • Television is “telling a vision” it wants you to see, but it’s not real; and
  • In order to change your situation, you must say: I love myself, I believe in myself, I’m proud of myself, I’m a genius. 

Brown told the students to start seeing themselves as who they want to be. For example, if you want to become a lawyer or a doctor, start referring to yourself as one. “Name it, claim it, frame it,” he said.

His son, for instance, wants to become a lawyer, so he refers to his son as Attorney Brown. “When someone asks you what you want to be, respond by saying, ‘I am,’” he said.

“You have two options,” he told the students. “Either you’re going to make it or you’re going to make it.”

Lessons Learned
Jeevan Brown, a business analyst and journalist, was the program’s second speaker during orientation.
He is the author of “A Lesson Learned,” which features 16 true college stories designed to help young adults and college students navigate through the pitfalls of college life.

A Landover, Md., native, Brown told his own story about how his GPA was a 2.29 in high school and that he attended Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte because it was the only school that accepted him.

He took advantage of opportunities in college and started working with the bi-weekly campus newspaper. One of his professors noticed he had a knack for engaging readers and quickly propelled him to feature editor of the paper.
While still a student, he worked as a feature writer for CharlotteVibe.com and was a correspondent for the Charlotte Bobcats NBA team. After graduation, he started writing for “OZONE Magazine” and interviewed several hip hop artists such as Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, Young Jeezy and The Underground Kings.

He encouraged students to write down their goals with timelines, and to make vision boards.

“If you want to kill your big dream, tell it to a small-minded person,” he said.

Using a PowerPoint presentation, he outlined highlights of the book including a chapter on achieving while grieving that tells the story of his best friend who died while he was in college; a chapter on HIGHway patrol about a friend who was smoking marijuana on the highway and got pulled over by a cop; and chapters on time management, focus and finance.

He gave students a quiz on the information using the Kahoot.it app and gave out prizes, as well as giving each student an autographed copy of his book.

“Don’t be influenced by your peers or music,” he said. “Watch the company that you keep. Don’t rush to be in a relationship. Stay focused.”

According to the Journal of Media, one of the biggest distractions for students is using digital devices in the classroom for non-classroom purposes.

“Elevation requires alienation,” he said. “Cut off distractions.”

Brown interviewed Livingstone’s police chief, Gloria Blaire, during the program, in which she talked about protocols students should follow if pulled over by an officer. “Don’t give them a reason to be hostile. Be courteous, watch your tone and voice level and make no sudden moves,” she said.

He also brought with him a special guest, Jamie Miller of Pageland, S.C., who owns 518 Media Group. Miller said she always wanted to own her own business, but a guidance counselor encouraged her to be an administrative assistant instead.

She followed her own heart and though financially challenged, she and her family managed to raise enough money to send her to college. Before her sophomore year, her father died of lung cancer and she considered dropping out of college to help her mother, but she resolved to continue.

After college, she landed a corporate job making good money, but a client made a racially insensitive comment about her hair. She eventually quit and started her own media group company. Her first project was the album release party of R&B’s Fantasia in 2014.

“Allow the mistakes others make to be the blueprint for what you shouldn’t do,” she said.

In addition to academics, the Bridge Program, which was started by President Dr. Jimmy Jenkins, Sr. in 2006, also places a strong focus on attitude and behavior in preparing students for college life. For more information about the program, call (704) 216-6874.
 

Rene McCoy named U.S. national sales manager for Montego Bay Convention Center

Renee McCoy

The Montego Bay Convention Centre, which is managed by SMG, has appointed Rene McCoy to spearhead its North American associations and corporate markets sales segment.
As national sales manager, McCoy will have direct responsibility for maintaining and acquiring business in the groups and conventions market. She is based in Washington, D.C., and will also be working closely with the Jamaica Tourist Board to improve market share in this segment, SMG said.
“I’m excited at this new prospect of working with the Montego Bay Convention Centre, this facility and the destination on a whole has so much to offer the meetings and conventions market. When you consider all the various elements that the destination has to offer, Montego Bay truly is an impressive meeting destination,” said McCoy in a written release.
A native of Brooklyn and a graduate of Livingstone College, McCoy comes with over 20 years of experience in the meetings and events industry, having served as Global Account Director for major hotel chains.
McCoy is an active member of Meeting Planners International (MPI) and Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA), where she serves on the Emerging Professionals Committee and is chair of the Generation Meet Website and Blog.
SMG provides management services to more than 230 public assembly facilities including convention and exhibition centers, arenas, stadiums, theaters, performing arts centers, amphitheaters, equestrian facilities, science centers and a variety of other venues. With facilities across the globe, SMG manages more than 15 million square feet of exhibition space and more than 1.5 million sports and entertainment seats.

Take it to the Bridge

Students earn second chances at Livingstone
For a contingent of students at Livingstone College, the next six weeks will not be a walk in the park, but more like basic training to prepare them for all aspects of college life.
“This is boot camp. I hope you survive,” Livingstone College President Dr. Jimmy Jenkins, Sr. told parents and students gathered inside Trent Gym on Saturday morning.
“We believe in you. You may not have done as well as you could have in high school or you might not have been able to get into another school, but you can get life out of a stone – at Livingstone,” he said.
The students are part of one of Livingstone College’s hallmark initiatives called the Bridge Program, which was started by Jenkins when he became president in 2006.
It gives students with academic deficiencies a second chance at getting into college. If these students commit to and complete the six-week intensive program, which operates under a boot-camp model, they will be admitted into Livingstone in the fall as provisional students and receive a stipend toward tuition.
The Bridge Program is like getting your record wiped clean, he told the students. “It’s like starting over­ – being reborn.”
Students follow a rigorous daily schedule including a 6 a.m. workout and morning devotion, followed by classes in math, reading and writing from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; academic enrichment sessions from 3-5 p.m.; and a range of fun and diverse evening and weekend activities.
“The number one destroyer of college education is freedom,” said Sylvester Kyles, Bridge Program director. “When students have a choice to get up for an 8 o’clock class or not, they are not getting up.”
But when students come to the Bridge Program and have to get up at 6 a.m., and then later get an 8 o’clock class when they are enrolled, they have actually slept in, he said. “It’s psychological. What we’re trying to change is attitude and behavior.”
There is a heavy emphasis on attitude and behavior, as well as teaching etiquette to students. Real Talk sessions held on weekends include conversations based on specific episodes of the former TV show, “A Different World,” and students hear from motivational speakers throughout the summer.
There is a talent showcase at the end of the program, where a Mr. and Mrs. Bridge are crowned.
Jenkins reinforced the rules of the program including the dress code, language and attendance.
Parents also signed contracts requiring them not to visit their children during the duration of Bridge – holidays and birthdays included.
Dr. Faleese Moore Jenkins, the First Lady of Livingstone College, encouraged parents to be strong. “All the things you taught your child will show up. Trust us, we do a good job at what we do.”
“Education is the surest vehicle for upward mobility in the world. It’s better than winning the lottery,” Jenkins told the audience.
“I know you have the capability, all you need is a second chance and at Livingstone, we give you that chance. This is the first day of the rest of your life. If you do well, they won’t talk about who you were in high school, but who you were at Livingstone,” he said in giving examples of Bridge students who have done exceptionally well post Livingstone.
“You say you want a college education, you say you want a second chance,” Jenkins said. “Be careful what you ask for because you just might get it. Guess what? You’ve got it.”
For more information about the Bridge Program, call Sylvester Kyles at (704) 216-6874.

Livingstone College President Dr. Jimmy Jenkins Sr. addresses the incoming Bridge students on June 24 inside Trent Gym on campus.

Livingstone College President Dr. Jimmy Jenkins, Sr. addresses the incoming Bridge students on June 24 inside Trent Gym on campus.

Livingstone College First Lady Dr. Faleese Moore Jenkins speaks candidly with parents.

Livingstone College First Lady Dr. Faleese Moore Jenkins speaks candidly with parents.

Tony Baldwin, admissions director, goes over guidelines of the Bridge program.

Tony Baldwin, associate vice president for the operations of students affairs/enrollment management, goes over guidelines of the Bridge program.

Bridge Program assistant Cherisse Hughes, right, presents a Livingstone College bag filled with goodies to each student upon completing registration.

Bridge Program assistant Cherisse Hughes, right, presents a Livingstone College bag filled with goodies to each student upon completing registration.

Five culinary arts students spending summer in China

China bound students

These five Livingstone College culinary arts students are spending their summer in China. Shown, from left, are Janice Hunt, 2017 LC graduate; Jacob Fisher; Hazikiah Johnson; Timothy Gray, 2017 LC graduate; and William Jackson II.

Livingstone College senior, William Jackson II, has never flown on an airplane before. But on Sunday, he boarded an international Delta flight to Shanghai, China, where he will spend part of his summer.
Jackson is one of three Livingstone College (LC) School of Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts students who will spend six weeks at Shanghai Second Polytechnic University (SSPU). They are also joined by two 2017 LC graduates.
The trip is part of the college’s International Studies and Study Abroad Program, directed by Earl M. Brown Jr. Students in other disciplines have traveled to India and France.
SSPU has a renowned culinary arts program, Brown said. The program will afford students a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to become immersed in China’s culture and cuisine.
“I want to learn how they do their sushi and other Chinese cuisine,” said Hazikiah Johnson of Shelby, an LC junior who wants to own a sports bar one day.
Johnson, whose first plane ride was the extensive flight to Shanghai, said his mother and grandmother had mixed emotions when he told them he was going to China. “They were scared for me, but happy for me at the same time.”China bound H. Johnson
During a pre-trip orientation meeting at Livingstone on June 8, Brown briefed the students on Chinese customs, traveling abroad and expectations of them not only as LC students, but as ambassadors of North Carolina and the United States.
“This experience could open up a world of possibilities for you,” he said. “It’s a chance to share your culture yet respect theirs.”
“Very few people get an opportunity to do this,” Dr. State Alexander, LC’s executive assistant to the president and director of public relations, told the group. “You will learn not just how to cook their cuisine, but this journey will provoke your view of the world to change as well as help you better understand the global community.”
Jacob Fisher of Salisbury, a sophomore culinary arts major at LC and an aspiring private chef, said he hopes to fine-tune the culinary basic skills he has already acquired at Livingstone.
Jackson hails from Tampa Bay, Fla., and is majoring in hospitality management at LC. His dream is to become a published songwriter, blending his degree with music for a career in Las Vegas. This trip is about food and cooking, but also learning how the Chinese people live, their advanced technology, physical activity and religious practices, Jackson said.
“We will do a lot of stuff, and I’m looking forward to being open and accept every challenge presented,” he said.
The five Livingstone College students will also be joined by other students from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) for the program this summer, which is part of the HBCU-China network, Brown said.
Livingstone’s culinary arts students raised their own money by selling prepared meals and through sponsorship letters.
Upon arrival, students will take a quick lesson in Mandarin Chinese, learning basic phrases and greetings. But Janice Hunt of Statesville, a 2017 LC grad on the trip, said she is also relying on a translation app.
Hunt is no stranger to traveling, having been a self-described military brat. She wants to one day work for a five-star restaurant and own a food truck.
Timothy Gray of New Jersey, a 2017 LC grad on the trip who wants to teach culinary arts, isn’t new to traveling abroad either or with interacting with diverse cultures. He has been to the Bahamas and works at Carowinds in Charlotte, where he meets people from all over the world, he said. He is hoping to learn Chinese chef knife skills while there.
The students all agreed that one thing on their must-see list is the Great Wall of China. But Fisher has a specific photo in mind.
Since the soft drink Cheerwine is produced in Salisbury, his hometown, “I want to wear a Cheerwine shirt while holding a Cheerwine drink in front of the Great Wall,” he said.
Students are expected to keep a journal and do a presentation on their trip upon return.

Funeral arrangements for Mrs. Delores Johnson

Funeral arrangements for Mrs. Delores Johnson, Livingstone College National Alumni Association president, are as follows:
Monday, June 12, at 1 p.m. at Trinity AME Zion Church, located at 631 E. Florida St.,Greensboro, NC. Family visitation begins at 12:30.
Interment will be held at noon on Tuesday, June 13, at Belmont Cemetery, 2000 E. Greenbriar St. in Statesville, NC.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to: LCNAA Scholarship Fund, Jackie Thompson Matthews, P.O. Box 1231, Kinston, NC 28503.

The Livingstone College family will observe a moment of silence on Monday, June 12, at 1 p.m. for Johnson and other Blue Bears who have recently passed including:

  • Debretta Pulliam ‘05;
  • Bennie Baker ‘67;
  • Jolene Fleming ‘53; and
  • Octavius Robinson (current student)

Veteran journalist joins staff at Livingstone College

Harrington KimberlySALISBURY- Livingstone College is pleased to announce that Kimberly Harrington of Lilesville has joined the staff as assistant director of public relations.

Harrington is an award-winning journalist with 23 years of experience in journalism and six years in public relations and marketing. She has served as staff writer and editor for numerous community newspapers in North and South Carolina.

“I consider this a full-circle moment,” Harrington said. “Livingstone was my first introduction to a historically black college as my sister attended there when I was in junior high school. It is where I became enamored with the idea of college life.”

Harrington’s career started at her hometown newspaper, The Anson Record, in Wadesboro. She has served as news editor of The Richmond County Daily Journal in Rockingham; city editor of The Enquirer-Journal in Monroe; and most recently as editor of The Pageland Progressive Journal in Pageland, S.C.

She was a columnist for The Charlotte Post while working as director of marketing and public relations for Sandhills Regional Medical Center in Hamlet.

Harrington has won awards for her writing, design and photography from press associations in both Carolinas including a 2016 first-place award for breaking news.

A community volunteer in her spare time, Harrington serves on the HOLLA! (Helping Our Loved ones Learn and Achieve) Board of Directors in Wadesboro, and is gala chairman for the Richmond County Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Foundation in Rockingham. She is a former member of the Richmond County United Way Board of Directors and former Richmond County Chamber of Commerce Ambassador.

A graduate of Winston-Salem State University, she is the daughter of Sarah Harrington of Lilesville and the late T.C. Ratliff.

Dr. State Alexander, Executive Assistant to the President and Director of Public Relations at Livingstone College, said Harrington’s wealth of experience, skillful writing and infectious energy have already made her a key addition to the college in advancing our mission of being a holistic learning environment.

“She comes already familiar with the school’s history being of the A.M.E. Zion denomination and having been exposed to the campus previously,” he said. “We are fortunate to find someone of this caliber with a familiarity of the school to fulfill this role.”

“I am excited to start a new challenge and work alongside a team to further develop efforts that will take Livingstone College to a new level of excellence,” Harrington said. “I am honored to have the opportunity to promote all that is great about this historic institution and let everyone know what I’ve known for a long time – you can get life out of a stone.”

About Livingstone College
Livingstone College, affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, is a private historically black institution secured by a strong commitment to quality instruction. Through a Christian-based environment suitable for learning, it provides excellent liberal arts and religious education programs for students from all ethnic backgrounds designed to develop their potential for leadership and service to a global community. For more information, visit www.livingstone.edu.

The One Hundred Thirty-Fourth Annual Baccalaureate Service of Livingstone College

As a Christian institution of higher learning founded by the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, students who matriculate beneath thy maples and thy oaks, are invited to begin their weekend of commencement events, in worship. The 134th Baccalaureate Service of Livingstone College was held Friday, May 5, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. in Bishop James Varick Auditorium. Presiding, Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins Sr., the twelfth president affirmed, “This event is designed to motivate graduates with spiritual weapons in order for them to command their rightful place in the global society.”
After the Board of Trustees, faculty, graduating seniors and Golden Graduates processed to “Pomp and Circumstance” in their colorful academic regalia, Bishop W. Darin Moore, Presiding Prelate of the Mid-Atlantic Episcopal District and Treasurer of the Board of Trustees, provided the Invocation followed by the congregational hymn, “God of Our Fathers.”
Bishop Michael A. Frencher Sr., Presiding Prelate of the South Western Delta Episcopal District and Secretary of the Board of Trustees read Isaiah 40: 28-31 as the Old Testament scripture and Bishop Seth O. Lartey, Presiding Prelate of the Alabama-Florida Episcopal District and Assistant Secretary of the Board of Trustees, conveyed Luke 8: 1-9, 11-15 as the New Testament reading.
Celebrating and thanking God for grace, Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Presiding Prelate of the Eastern North Carolina Episcopal District, Bishop Kenneth Monroe offered a prayer of thanks for saving, rescuing and protecting the leadership, church and students of Livingstone College. He implored, “Celebrate what God has allowed us to achieve.”
Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Presiding Prelate of the Piedmont Episcopal District, senior Bishop, George E. Battle Jr., introduced the speaker, Bishop Darryl B. Starnes Sr., Presiding Prelate of the Mid-West Episcopal District. Bishop Battle acknowledged Bishop Starnes as the elected Chaplain, stating “He [Starnes] communicates with God for all of us,” and avowed Starnes as, “ . . . a spiritual and studious disciple maker for Jesus Christ.”
After the Livingstone College Concert Choir’s selection, “Oh How I Love Jesus,” those present were able to attest to the words of Bishop Battle.  Explicating Luke 8: 11-15, Bishop Starnes’s sermon titled, “God’s Word and the Human Heart,” encouraged graduates to examine the text by considering four heart conditions; a hardened heart, a shallow heart, a crowded heart and a healthy heart. Starnes continued a healthy heart is a mature heart and a mature heart, “. . . shoots, roots, and produces good fruit.”
Closing with a blessing from Jude 24, Bishop Staccato Powell, Presiding Prelate of the Western Episcopal District pronounced the Benediction while those in attendance recessed to Henry Purcell’s “Trumpet Tune.”